1. Just Do It!

    August 14, 2014 by Paul Chappell

    book-review-buy-the-field

    This summer I read Pastor Rob Fleshman’s book, Buy the Field: Find, Follow and Finish God’s Will for Your Life.

    One of the aspects about this book that I loved was its biblical bias for action. Like Nike’s “Just Do It” slogan, Pastor Fleshman challenges readers to carefully consider a field and then buy it. Jump in—all in—and get to work.

    Sometimes we become so cautious and hesitant that we miss following through on the great opportunities God places in front of us. And sometimes, because we see personal cost or sacrifice involved in following God’s plan, we’re unwilling to step out in faith. But if we would just “buy the field,” acting on the opportunities and directions God lays before us, we would discover great treasure. (more…)


  2. 10 Ways to Know if You Should Read Out of Commission

    May 28, 2014 by Paul Chappell

    OutOfCommissionBook

    As I wrote my newest book, Out of Commission, I had a specific audience in mind—you!

    Seriously, I wrote this book for both pastors and laypeople with the goal of encouraging and equipping all of us in making Christ’s last command our first priority.

    If you’re wondering if this book is indeed for you (or if it would be a good read for someone you know), here are ten ways to know: (more…)


  3. Book Review: The Making of a Man of God

    May 17, 2014 by Paul Chappell

    The-Making-of-a-Man-of-God

    In churches today there is a dearth of men of God—men whose hearts follow after the Lord and who are spiritual leaders in their homes.

    But this dearth is not unique to our time period or culture. In 1 Samuel 13:14, Scripture notes that God had to search for such a man to lead His people: “…the Lord hath sought him a man after his own heart….”

    What does it take to become a “man of God”? It is not as simple as merely being a Christian man, for not every Christian man has his heart fixed on things of the Lord. Nor is it as simple as being a pastor or preacher, for doing the work of God does not guarantee that a man’s heart is right with God.

    In The Making of a Man of God, author Alan Redpath develops what it means to be a “man of God” and how God develops the man’s heart who is yielded to Him. I appreciate this book for its emphasis on the heart and on spiritual leadership. I even asked the men in our church this January to read it this year. We’ve scheduled a few times throughout the year to meet for prayer and discussion of the chapters we’ve read. (more…)


  4. The Best Marriage Book I’ve Read This Year

    February 14, 2014 by Paul Chappell

    The-Exemplary-Husband

    When Terrie and I got married thirty-three years ago, one of the commitments we made was to keep growing as husband and wife. Every year, I read at least one book on marriage (usually more), and Terrie does the same. Often we read the same book and then discuss it together.

    The most recent book I read, however, was just for me—The Exemplary Husband by Stuart Scott. Without a doubt, it is one of the best books I’ve ever read on marriage.

    The topics covered in this book get right to the heart issues of marriage (although the first three chapters are pretty basic and a little slow). The author uses much Scripture throughout the book, and he provides lists with practical, bullet point applications—just what we men need.

    For instance, here are his main thoughts with bulleted lists on “Ways a Husband Can Treat His Wife as His Companion”: (more…)


  5. Book Review: Rescuing Ambition

    January 15, 2014 by Paul Chappell

    Rescuing-Ambition-Harvey

    Type As like me rarely need to be encouraged to develop ambition. But we do need to be encouraged to purify our ambition.

    Conversely, Type Bs often need to be encouraged to pursue godly ambition.

    Rescuing Ambition by Dave Harvey addresses both ends of the spectrum. It’s not a book about personality types in the least; it’s about developing and pursuing ambitions that honor and glorify God.

    We live in a culture that loudly and persistently tells us to promote ourselves and satisfy our quest for recognition and accomplishment. As Christians, we are sometimes prone to counter these voices by quenching ambition altogether—by viewing humility and ambition as opposing values. (more…)